Learn

Eight phrases with "back" for travel and how to use them like a pro.

8 Phrasal Verbs with BACK and How To Use Them Like a Pro

The preposition back generally means to return. But there are many different ways you can return something or somewhere! By using phrasal verbs like go back, get back, and come back, you can increase your vocabulary and be more specific in communication. Let's look at a few of these phrasal verbs with back in a fun short story about a trip to a tropical island. At the end of the story, there's a short quiz you can take to see if you really know how to use these return expressions like a pro.

Used to vs. Usually: What’s the Difference?

When you have a strong understanding of how to use used to and usually, we can talk about 2 more similar phrases that students find confusing: be used to and get used to.

Listen vs. Hear: What’s the difference?

Listen and hear are two verbs commonly confused by English students. Many times, we use both words in the same conversation. It's important to know what the difference is. Look at this example: A: Hi! Can you hear me? What are you listening to? B: I'm listening to Hotel California by The Eagles. Have you … Continue reading Listen vs. Hear: What’s the difference?

Speak the Language of Love: Vocabulary for romantic relationships

Love is in the air, so I wanted to share some great vocabulary for romantic relationships. You'll see these phrases on television, in movies, and of course, whenever people talk about being in love.  No matter what stage of a relationship you're in––single, dating, married, or something else (it's complicated)––there are creative ways to describe your … Continue reading Speak the Language of Love: Vocabulary for romantic relationships

vocabulary for ordering drinks at a bar

What’s Your Poison? Vocabulary for ordering drinks at a bar

Ordering drinks can be intimidating for a non-native speaker. Everything is moving fast, so you quickly blurt out your order. "I'll have 3 beers and...um...uh...a mojito." There. You feel pretty good. You said it right. He understands you and starts to make the drinks, but suddenly he asks a second question...

Too vs. So: What’s the difference?

TOO = A negative description When something is not good, or you don't like it, or you can't use it, use too to describe it. When you use too in a sentence, it means that you are not happy, or there is a negative result. The driver was going too fast. (He crashed his car … Continue reading Too vs. So: What’s the difference?

What's the difference between so and such?

So or Such: What’s the difference?

Cats are so funny. You never know what they are really thinking about you, but we can guess from the look on their faces. They make such good expressions! THE BASIC RULE: S0 + ADJECTIVE When SO means "very," it is usually followed by an adjective. It's so hot today.The cats are so funny.She looks … Continue reading So or Such: What’s the difference?

8 Words in English Difficult To Pronounce for Non-Native Speakers

English is not an easy language to pronounce! If you're having trouble with your tongue, read on. English borrows words from many different languages, so the rules for pronunciation can change depending on the origin of the word, the meaning of the word, or even the region where the word is spoken. Here are some … Continue reading 8 Words in English Difficult To Pronounce for Non-Native Speakers

How to pronounce words like beer, bird, and bear.

Pronunciation: Beer, Bird, and Bear

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VDL-scfDBCo&t=14s

Yet vs. still: What's the difference?

Yet vs. Still: What’s the difference?

Learn the difference between yet and still with a quick video lesson.