irregular-verb flashcard
Collocations, Grammar, Online Learning, Speaking, Teacher's Tips, Vocabulary

8 Flashy Ways To Use Flashcards for Online ESL

If you know how to use flashcards in online ESL classrooms, they can be fantastic for memorizing irregular verbs. And they don't have to be boring, either! Here are my favorite flashy ways to use flashcards in online ESL classrooms. Why Flashcards? Let's cut straight to the obvious: flashcards are for memorizing. As a veteran… Continue reading 8 Flashy Ways To Use Flashcards for Online ESL

Pronunciation, Speaking, Vocabulary

How To Pronounce the GH sound in English: 14 Tough Words To Practice

This month's post teaches you how to pronounce the -gh sound in English. You've probably seen it lurking in words like enough, through, and sigh. You might try your best to pronounce it, or, you might avoid it completely. Through? Furlough? Cough. Ugh. What is that sound?!

Collocations, Phrasal Verbs, Speaking, Vocabulary

English Expressions You Can Fall in Love With

With Valentine's Day coming up, I wanted to share some great expressions and idioms for talking about love and relationships. Whether you're single, married or something more complicated, there's surely a phrase or two here that will tickle your fancy. You may find yourself falling head over heels with this lovey-dovey vocabulary! Once Upon a… Continue reading English Expressions You Can Fall in Love With

vocabulary for ordering drinks at a bar
Collocations, Speaking, Vocabulary

What’s your poison? English for ordering drinks at a bar

Ordering drinks can be intimidating for a non-native speaker. Everything is moving fast, so you quickly blurt out your order. "I'll have 3 beers and...um...uh...a mojito." There. You feel pretty good. You said it right. He understands you and starts to make the drinks, but suddenly he asks a second question...

the difference between history and story
Collocations, Speaking, Vocabulary

History vs. Story: What’s the Difference?

History: The study of past events or people History is a subject that we study in school. We study the history of civilizations, important people, or topics, like the history of art. We only use the word history when referring to major events or people from the past. HIS-tuh-ree I studied art history in college.… Continue reading History vs. Story: What’s the Difference?

Pronunciation, Speaking, Vocabulary

3 Confusing Verbs and How To Pronounce Them: Feel, Fall, and Fill

Three verbs that are often confusing for English students are feel, fall, and fill, especially when it comes to past tense forms and pronunciation. Let's look at the differences and practice using them. Feel Feel has a hard EEE sound. You need to smile when you say this word, making your mouth wide. Practice this… Continue reading 3 Confusing Verbs and How To Pronounce Them: Feel, Fall, and Fill

Collocations, Speaking, Vocabulary

Expressions with the Verb TO HAVE

I hope everyone is having a very Happy New Year so far! I think 2019 is going to be a great year! This year, I'm looking forward to eating healthier, learning new recipes, getting more exercise, and writing many more lessons for all the English learners out there. How about you? Do you have any plans… Continue reading Expressions with the Verb TO HAVE

Grammar, Speaking, Vocabulary

Still Or Until: What’s the Difference?

These two very common words are easy to confuse. They both relate to a measure of time. However, they have completely different meanings, and it's important to know which one to choose.

Pronunciation, Speaking, Vocabulary

8 Words in English Difficult To Pronounce for Non-Native Speakers

English is not an easy language to pronounce! If you're having trouble with your tongue, read on. English borrows words from many different languages, so the rules for pronunciation can change depending on the origin of the word, the meaning of the word, or even the region where the word is spoken. Here are some of the most common English words that are difficult for non-native speakers to pronounce.

go back or come back: what's the difference?
Collocations, Grammar, Phrasal Verbs, Speaking, Vocabulary

Go Back or Come Back: What’s the Difference?

When talking about travel, it's easy to confuse the phrasal verbs go back and come back. They both mean to return. So what's the difference? It's actually very simple. It all depends on where you are at the time of speaking. For example, if you are from Italy, but you are in California right now, you would say: I'm going… Continue reading Go Back or Come Back: What’s the Difference?

A visual chart to show expressions that use the verb take in english
Speaking, Vocabulary

Visual Vocabulary – Common English Expressions with TAKE

Take a few minutes to think about the verb TO TAKE. To Take literally means "to bring something with you." Take an umbrella, or take a book to read, for example. However, many other activities use this verb, even though you are not really "taking" anything. Here are some of the more commons expressions that are formed with take. Take… Continue reading Visual Vocabulary – Common English Expressions with TAKE