Eight phrases with "back" for travel and how to use them like a pro.

8 Phrasal Verbs with BACK and How To Use Them Like a Pro

The preposition back generally means to return. But there are many different ways you can return something or somewhere! By using phrasal verbs like go back, get back, and come back, you can increase your vocabulary and be more specific in communication. Let's look at a few of these phrasal verbs with back in a fun short story about a trip to a tropical island. At the end of the story, there's a short quiz you can take to see if you really know how to use these return expressions like a pro.

Used to vs. Usually: What’s the Difference?

When you have a strong understanding of how to use used to and usually, we can talk about 2 more similar phrases that students find confusing: be used to and get used to.

Yet vs. still: What's the difference?

Yet vs. Still: What’s the difference?

Learn the difference between yet and still with a quick video lesson.

Speak the Language of Love: Vocabulary for romantic relationships

Love is in the air, so I wanted to share some great vocabulary for romantic relationships. You'll see these phrases on television, in movies, and of course, whenever people talk about being in love.  No matter what stage of a relationship you're in––single, dating, married, or something else (it's complicated)––there are creative ways to describe your … Continue reading Speak the Language of Love: Vocabulary for romantic relationships

Borrow or Lend: What’s the difference?

It's easy to confuse these two terms. They are used when we give or take something that will be returned (Well, we hope it will!) LEND = Give To lend is to give someone something for a short time. Lend requires a direct pronoun (money, a phone, a sweater, etc.) and an indirect object pronoun (me, … Continue reading Borrow or Lend: What’s the difference?